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‏إظهار الرسائل ذات التسميات Conflict. إظهار كافة الرسائل
‏إظهار الرسائل ذات التسميات Conflict. إظهار كافة الرسائل

4/26/2017

Egypt: Video of extrajudicial executions offers glimpse of hidden abuses by military in North Sinai

4/26/2017 0

video Appears to Show Egyptian Soldiers Killing 

Unarmed Men in Sinai




Warning - Item Video shows Egyptian soldiers executing prisoners in Sinai might contain content that is not suitable for all ages.

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 A video has emerged that appears to show members of the Egyptian military shooting unarmed detainees to death at point-blank range in the Sinai Peninsula and staging the killings to look as if they had happened in combat.
The leaked video, which was posted on social media on Thursday, could undercut claims made by the Egyptian Army in December that the men were suspected terrorists who died in a fight with the military.
The video was released the same day that Defense Secretary Jim Mattis met in Egypt with its president, Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, to discuss improving their countries’ military relationship. It also comes after human rights groups accused the Egyptian military of killing up to 10 men in January in a staged counterterrorism raid in Sinai.
The three-minute video, which was released through a channel associated with the 




Muslim Brotherhood, appears to depict part of a raid that the Egyptian Army highlighted in a Facebook post on Dec. 6, 2016. That post included photos of three bloody men in a grassy area with rifles next to them. The post said they had been killed in a military raid on a terrorist base and an explosives storehouse.
Eight people were killed and four others were arrested, the military said on Facebook in December, as Egyptian armed forces “continued to tighten their security grip” in the Sinai Peninsula, where the country has waged a yearslong battle.
But the video shows no firefight and starts with soldiers mingling next to an armored truck in a sandy field scattered with bodies next to shrubs and grassy patches. But it does show the killing of at least three people. In one case, a soldier casually holds a rifle over a man on the ground and shoots him in the head. In another, soldiers escort a blindfolded man into the field, place him on his knees and shoot him multiple times in the head and upper body.
The pro-state Egyptian news site Youm7 called the video a fabrication carried out by the Muslim Brotherhood, which is banned in the country, and said the people in the video did not have Egyptian accents. An Egyptian military spokesman did not respond to a request for comment late Thursday.

 one point in the video, a man off camera tells a soldier in Arabic to shoot the captured men in a variety of places. “Don’t just do the head, O.K.? Don’t just do the head,” the person said.
In addition to the three men seen killed, the video shows two men lying on the ground who were apparently in the Facebook post. The same men included in the Facebook post in December were apparently also shown in a military video shared on YouTube in November for an operation that claimed to have killed eight terrorists “during clashes.”
Sarah Leah Whitson, the executive director of Human Rights Watch’s Middle East and North Africa Division, which released a report about the January killings, said the group was investigating the latest video.
“We have not yet verified the video, and are working on it,” Ms. Whitson said in an email. “But it accords closely with our findings about other summary executions in Sinai and Cairo.”
Mokhtar Awad, a militancy expert at George Washington University, said the video was unlikely to be widely discussed on Egyptian news media because of emergency laws enacted by Mr. Sisi last week after suicide attacks by the Islamic State on two Christians churches on Palm Sunday.
“The worst thing I’ve seen before is of soldiers beating a guy,” Mr. Awad said. “We’ve never seen video from Sinai or elsewhere showing an Egyptian serviceman killing someone in cold blood.”
Together with the accusations of extrajudicial executions in Sinai in January, Mr. Awad said, it suggested “a growing level of impunity” in parts of the Egyptian military, particularly in Sinai where local emergency laws have been in place for years.
“It is a significant problem, and something that needs to be seriously addressed,” he said. “Otherwise things could head in a very problematic direction, of this somehow becoming a new normal.”


5/25/2016

#UK seeks #Saudi cluster bomb assurances over #Yemen

5/25/2016 0

UK seeks Saudi cluster bomb assurances over Yemen


Cluster bombsImage copyrightAMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Image captionAmnesty claims it found these UK-made cluster bombs in Yemen

The UK government has sought fresh assurances from Saudi Arabia that British-made cluster bombs have not been used in the conflict in Yemen.

Amnesty International said it had documented the use of the weapons, manufactured in the 1970s.
Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond told MPs there was currently no evidence Saudi Arabia had used cluster bombs.
Mr Hammond said the weapons described were decades old and it was now illegal to supply such bombs under British law.
Answering an urgent question in the Commons, defence minister Philip Dunne said the UK had ratified the Convention on Cluster Munitions in 2010 and no longer supplied, manufactured or supported them.
He said there had been several conflicts in that region in the past decade so it was not clear that the evidence found had come from the current fighting.
Shadow defence secretary Emily Thornberry asked whether the Saudi military had used British planes to drop cluster bombs and what was the extent of British involvement in the conflict.
Mr Dunne replied: "I can categorically reassure [you] that no British planes have been involved in this coalition effort at all, let alone in dropping cluster munitions - that is the potential allegation. There is no British involvement in the coalition in targeting or weaponising aircraft to undertake missions."

'Nasty weapon'



Amnesty has written to Prime Minister David Cameron calling for a government inquiry into the allegations.
The human rights group claimed it found a partially-exploded BL-755 cluster bomb which had apparently malfunctioned, leaving scores of unexploded bomblets strewn over a wide area near a farm in Al-khadhra village, six miles from the Saudi border.
Amnesty said the bomb was originally manufactured by Bedfordshire company Hunting Engineering Ltd in the 1970s.
Amnesty International UK arms control director Oliver Sprague said: "Cluster bombs are one of the nastiest weapons in the history of warfare, rightly banned by more than 100 countries, so it's truly shocking that a British cluster munition has been dropped on a civilian area in Yemen."

Cluster bombs explained

  • The Convention on Cluster Munitions prohibits all use, stockpiling, production and transfer of cluster bombs
  • The convention has 108 signatories and became binding international law in 2010
  • Cluster bombs pose particular risks to civilians because they release many small bomblets over a wide area
  • During attacks, they are prone to indiscriminate effects especially in populated areas
  • Unexploded bomblets can kill or maim civilians long after a conflict has ended, and are costly to locate and remove
Source: United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs

A Saudi-led coalition of Arab air forces began carrying out airstrikes against Houthi rebels in Yemen last year.
The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights estimates that at least 3,200 civilians have been killed and 5,700 wounded, with 60% of the casualties caused by airstrikes, in that time.
The conflict between President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi's UN-recognised government and the rebels began in September 2014
https://youtu.be/tIAVAYyioi4
https://youtu.be/Mpwo4vyn1n0

#bbc

4/13/2013

Judge recuses himself in #Mubarak retrial, case adjourned indefinitely #egypt

4/13/2013










A retrial for ex-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak was postponed after the judge recused himself from case, referring it to another court. Mubarak was charged with abuse of power that led to the killing, abduction and torture of protesters in 2011.
Judge Moustafa Hassan Abdallah announced his refusal to preside over the case after the 84-year old Mubarak was delivered to court at a Cairo police academy from the military hospital where he is currently being detained.
The judge said he did not want to “embarrass” himself, and referred the case to the Cairo appeals court.
Once the court session ended, the same army helicopter that brought Mubarak to court returned him to the military hospital.
Clashes erupted both inside and outside the courtroom after the judge made his announcement.
The court is being guarded by 3,000 soldiers and police officers, along with 150 armored vehicles, Interior Minister Mohamed Ibrahim told Egypt Independent.
Later, Egyptian Prosecutor General Talaat Abdullah has requested that Mubarak to be transferred from Cairo's military hospital ward to a cell in Tora Prison.
The former Egyptian president will face the same charges of complicity in the mass-murder of nearly 900 protesters during the country's Arab Spring uprising in February 2011.
Egyptian pro-democracy activists gather in the coastal city of Alexandria on April 1, 2011 during a protest calling for the trial of ousted president Hosni Mubarak and to pressure the current government to pursue political reforms (AFP Photo / STR)
Egyptian pro-democracy activists gather in the coastal city of Alexandria on April 1, 2011 during a protest calling for the trial of ousted president Hosni Mubarak and to pressure the current government to pursue political reforms (AFP Photo / STR)
Mubarak has already been sentenced to life in prison for his suppression of the revolution in Egypt two years ago, but in January 2013 an appeals court overturned that ruling and ordered a retrial.
The judge also ordered a retrial of former Interior Minister Habib Al Adly, who is serving a life sentence.
Judge Moustafa Hassan Abdallah also reopened corruption and murder trials against six of Mubarak’s top security officers, a business partner of the former president – tycoon Hussein Salem, who is being tried in absentia – and two of his sons, Gamal and Alaa; all nine of the co-defendants were previously acquitted.
Egyptian anti-government demonstrators (top) face pro-regime opponents (bottom) in Cairo's Tahrir Square where crowds have gathered for a protest calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak on February 2, 2011 (AFP Photo / STR)
Egyptian anti-government demonstrators (top) face pro-regime opponents (bottom) in Cairo's Tahrir Square where crowds have gathered for a protest calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak on February 2, 2011 (AFP Photo / STR)
The first trial took place in 2011, and was expected to become a symbol of change in Egypt. Instead, Egyptians were frustrated last June by how most of the military and civil officials implicated in the bloodbath following protests in the capital Cairo had avoided any punishment. Apart from Mubarak’s Interior Minister, his aides and deputies were acquitted.
The new trial has sparked little public protest, as Egyptians no longer expect landslide verdicts.
Many of the relatives of those killed during the revolution do not believe the retrial will change anything. The Egyptians that the Guardian spoke to said that the trial is a hoax; a recently leaked report exposing atrocities committed by the army would not be taken into account.
Egyptian anti-government demonstrators face pro-regime opponents in Cairo's Tahrir Square where crowds have gathered for a protest calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak on February 2, 2011 (AFP Photo / STR)
Egyptian anti-government demonstrators face pro-regime opponents in Cairo's Tahrir Square where crowds have gathered for a protest calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak on February 2, 2011 (AFP Photo / STR)
The results of a new investigation ordered by Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi in June 2012 were summed up in a confidential presidential report allegedly presented to Morsi in January.
Parts of the document were leaked earlier this week by the Guardian. The report exposed the abduction, torture and killing of protesters by the army, as well as intentional medical malpractice.
After the report was leaked, Morsi promoted three army generals this week – many observers believe this shows the new Egyptian president’s unwillingness to defy the military.
Egyptian soldiers detain an injured anti-government demonstrator following clashes between anti-government demonstrators and pro-regime opponents in Cairo's Tahrir square where crowds have gathered for a protest calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak on February 2, 2011 (AFP Photo / STR)
Egyptian soldiers detain an injured anti-government demonstrator following clashes between anti-government demonstrators and pro-regime opponents in Cairo's Tahrir square where crowds have gathered for a protest calling for the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak on February 2, 2011 (AFP Photo / STR)