‏إظهار الرسائل ذات التسميات MIDDLE EAST. إظهار كافة الرسائل
‏إظهار الرسائل ذات التسميات MIDDLE EAST. إظهار كافة الرسائل

11/04/2017

WE NEED TALK

 WE NEED TALK

When Egypt's World Youth Forum #WeNeedToTalk backfires #WTF



Many Egyptians on social media have adopted the slogan of an upcoming state-sponsored youth conference to air grievances about the way the country is run.
The World Youth Forum conference will be held in Sharm el-Sheikh from 4 November. Its promotional hashtag #WeNeedToTalk is intended to engage young people, attract world leaders and send a message of peace.
The Forum launched a video on social media on 21 October to promote the issue which has been viewed more than seven million times
International-sharm
Banner image from We Need To Talk video from World Youth ForumImage copyrightWORLD YOUTH FORUM
Image captionThe World Youth Forum video has been viewed more than seven million times
However, activists on Twitter and Facebook have used #WeNeedToTalk to contrast Egypt's aim of freedom expression for youth with what they believe to be an ongoing crackdown on Egyptians' rights and freedom.
At time of writing, the hashtag has been used 72,000 times.
Many of those criticising the government circulated pictures of security forces chasing or assaulting protesters. Others posted pictures of activists or detainees believed to have been detained by the police.









8/30/2017

Buthaina Eyes turned to the icon calls to end the war in Yemen

Buthaina Eyes  turned to the icon calls to end the war in Yemen 




A shocking photo showing a young girl covered in bruises and with a badly swollen face after she lost most of her family in a Saudi-led air strike on Yemen has triggered a furious anti-war backlash.
Buthaina Muhammad Mansour, who is believed to be between four and five years old, does not know that her parents, five siblings, and uncle were killed when their home was flattened in an air strike in Yemen's capital Sanaa on 25 August.
SANAA (Reuters) - Her bruised eyes still swollen shut, Buthaina Muhammad Mansour, believed to be four or five, doesn't yet know that her parents, five siblings and uncle were killed when an air strike flattened their home in Yemen's capital.


Despite concussion and skull fractures, doctors think Buthaina will pull through -- her family's sole survivor of the Aug 25 attack on an apartment building that residents blame on a Saudi-led coalition fighting in Yemen since 2015.
The alliance said in a statement it would investigate the air strike, which killed at least 12 civilians.
Yemen's long war involving competing Yemeni factions and regional power struggles has killed at least 10,000 people. Millions more have been forced to leave their homes and face disease and hunger.
Aid agencies have called for a speedy resolution to the conflict, warning that the impoverished country is now victim to the world's greatest man-made humanitarian disaster.
Lying disoriented in her hospital bed on Saturday, Buthaina called out for her uncle, Mounir, who was among those killed in the attack.
Another uncle, Saleh Muhammad Saad, told Reuters Mounir had rushed to the family's house when Buthaina's father called him at 2 a.m. to say war planes were bombing their neighborhood in Sanaa's Faj Attan district. He never returned.
By the time Saleh got to the house, it was a ruin of broken concrete blocks and wooden planks. Hearing survivors groaning from beneath the rubble, he battled to free them.
"I could hear the shouts of one of their neighbors from under the rubble, and tried to remove the rubble from on top of (Buthaina's father) and his wife, but I couldn't. They died," he said.
"We lifted the rubble and saw first her brother Ammar, who was three, and her four sisters, all of them dead. I paused a little and just screamed out from the pain. But I pulled myself together, got back there and then heard Buthaina calling."
He said her survival had given him some solace as he mourned the rest of the family.
"Her sister Raghad always used to come up and hug me and kiss me when I visited. I used to say to her, 'Come on, that's enough.' And she would say 'Oh no it isn't!' and just keep hugging and kissing."
(Writing by Noah Browning; Editing by Helen Popper)
Copyright 2017 Thomson Reuters.



 UPDATE:
BBC


One-eyed unity with injured Yemeni girl


People in Yemen are sharing photos on social media of themselves with one eye closed in solidarity with a young girl injured and orphaned in an air strike.
Bouthaina al-Rimi's home in the Attan neighbourhood of Sanaa, the capital of Yemen, was bombed and destroyed on 25 August. The blast killed her parents and six siblings.

By sharing photos of themselves closing an eye, people in Yemen are hoping to raise awareness of the crisis. Half a million children under five are suffering severe acute malnutrition, and the cholera outbreak is the largest in the world, infecting over 500,00 people.

The Arabic hashtag #Bouthaina_The_Eye_Of_Humanity and #I_SPEAK_FOR_BUTHINA have both been used more than 3,000 times since Wednesday.

Buthaina Muhammad Mansour being rescued from the site of a Saudi-led air strike on Sanaa which killed eight of her family members.

Wiam Adil Maktari's post on Facebook

Some Twitter uses called for an end to the war.

"For Bouthaina and all of Yemen's children, we say YES to the end of war,"





















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1/17/2017

Saudi War Crimes Yemen



Saudi War Crimes Yemen: 10,000 civilians killed and 40,000 injured in conflict, 

UN reveals







UPDATE 1/18/2017


The US is promoting war crimes in Yemen

Yemen: No Accountability for War Crimes


Parties to Yemen’s armed conflict violated the laws of war with impunity in 2016, Human Rights Watch said today in its World Report 2017. Concerned governments should seek accountability for past and ongoing violations and immediately suspend arms sales to Saudi Arabia.
The Saudi Arabia-led coalition has carried out military operations, supported by the United States and United Kingdom, against Houthi forces and forces loyal to former President Ali Abdullah Saleh since March 2015. The coalition has unlawfully attacked homes, markets, hospitals, schools, civilian businesses, and mosques. As of October 10, 2016, at least 4,125 civilians had been killed and 6,711 wounded, the majority by coalition airstrikes, according to the United Nations human rights office.






People inspect a house after it was destroyed by a Saudi-led airstrike in the capital, Sanaa, February 25, 2016.
People inspect a house after it was destroyed by a Saudi-led airstrike in the capital, Sanaa, February 25, 2016. 

"None of the forces in Yemen’s conflict seem to fear being held to account for violating the laws of war,” said Sarah Leah Whitson, Middle East director at Human Rights Watch. “UN members need to press the parties to end the slaughter and the suffering of civilians.”
In the 687-page World Report, its 27th edition, Human Rights Watch reviews human rights practices in more than 90 countries. In his introductory essay, Executive Director Kenneth Roth writes that a new generation of authoritarian populists seeks to overturn the concept of human rights protections, treating rights as an impediment to the majority will. For those who feel left behind by the global economy and increasingly fear violent crime, civil society groups, the media, and the public have key roles to play in reaffirming the values on which rights-respecting democracy has been built.
Both sides to the conflict have repeatedly violated the laws of war. Human Rights Watch has documented 61 apparently unlawful Saudi-led coalition airstrikes, some of which may amount to war crimes. The coalition has also used internationally banned cluster munitions. Neither the US nor the UK have suspended arms sales to Saudi Arabia despite increasing evidence of their use in the conflict and the coalition’s failure to credibly investigate alleged violations. In 2015, the US approved more than US$20 billion worth of weapons sales to Saudi Arabia, and the UK approved arms sales worth $4 billion.
Since taking control of the capital, Sanaa, in September 2014, the Houthis and their allies have carried out a campaign of arbitrary detentions and enforced disappearances against perceived opponents. They have launched artillery rockets in indiscriminate attacks into southern Saudi Arabia and in Yemen, killing 475 civilians and wounding 1,121 between July1, 2015, and June 30, 2016, according to the UN. Houthi and allied forces have also laid banned anti-personnel landmines that have killed and wounded dozens of civilians.
None of the warring parties credibly investigated their forces’ alleged laws-of-war violations in Yemen. The coalition-appointed Joint Incidents Assessment Team (JIAT) released findings that differed drastically from those of the UN and others. The US, a party to the conflict by providing targeting intelligence and in-air refueling for coalition attacks, is not known to have investigated any alleged unlawful strikes in which its forces may have taken part.
As of November, the US reported it had conducted 28 drone strikes in Yemen in 2016, killing dozens of people described as Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) operatives. Both AQAP and armed groups linked to the Islamic State, also known as ISIS, claimed responsibility for numerous suicide and other bombings that have unlawfully killed dozens.
Parties to the conflict block or restrict critical relief supplies from reaching civilians, deepening the country’s crisis. The coalition has imposed an air and naval blockade on Yemen, limiting the importation of vital goods, and Houthi and allied forces have confiscated food and medical supplies from civilians entering Taizz and blocked aid from reaching the city, contributing to the near collapse of its health system.






5/25/2016

#UK seeks #Saudi cluster bomb assurances over #Yemen

UK seeks Saudi cluster bomb assurances over Yemen


Cluster bombsImage copyrightAMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Image captionAmnesty claims it found these UK-made cluster bombs in Yemen

The UK government has sought fresh assurances from Saudi Arabia that British-made cluster bombs have not been used in the conflict in Yemen.

Amnesty International said it had documented the use of the weapons, manufactured in the 1970s.
Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond told MPs there was currently no evidence Saudi Arabia had used cluster bombs.
Mr Hammond said the weapons described were decades old and it was now illegal to supply such bombs under British law.
Answering an urgent question in the Commons, defence minister Philip Dunne said the UK had ratified the Convention on Cluster Munitions in 2010 and no longer supplied, manufactured or supported them.
He said there had been several conflicts in that region in the past decade so it was not clear that the evidence found had come from the current fighting.
Shadow defence secretary Emily Thornberry asked whether the Saudi military had used British planes to drop cluster bombs and what was the extent of British involvement in the conflict.
Mr Dunne replied: "I can categorically reassure [you] that no British planes have been involved in this coalition effort at all, let alone in dropping cluster munitions - that is the potential allegation. There is no British involvement in the coalition in targeting or weaponising aircraft to undertake missions."

'Nasty weapon'



Amnesty has written to Prime Minister David Cameron calling for a government inquiry into the allegations.
The human rights group claimed it found a partially-exploded BL-755 cluster bomb which had apparently malfunctioned, leaving scores of unexploded bomblets strewn over a wide area near a farm in Al-khadhra village, six miles from the Saudi border.
Amnesty said the bomb was originally manufactured by Bedfordshire company Hunting Engineering Ltd in the 1970s.
Amnesty International UK arms control director Oliver Sprague said: "Cluster bombs are one of the nastiest weapons in the history of warfare, rightly banned by more than 100 countries, so it's truly shocking that a British cluster munition has been dropped on a civilian area in Yemen."

Cluster bombs explained

  • The Convention on Cluster Munitions prohibits all use, stockpiling, production and transfer of cluster bombs
  • The convention has 108 signatories and became binding international law in 2010
  • Cluster bombs pose particular risks to civilians because they release many small bomblets over a wide area
  • During attacks, they are prone to indiscriminate effects especially in populated areas
  • Unexploded bomblets can kill or maim civilians long after a conflict has ended, and are costly to locate and remove
Source: United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs

A Saudi-led coalition of Arab air forces began carrying out airstrikes against Houthi rebels in Yemen last year.
The UN High Commissioner for Human Rights estimates that at least 3,200 civilians have been killed and 5,700 wounded, with 60% of the casualties caused by airstrikes, in that time.
The conflict between President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi's UN-recognised government and the rebels began in September 2014
https://youtu.be/tIAVAYyioi4
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#bbc

5/19/2016

EgyptAir Flight 804 vanishes from radar with 66 people aboard


EgyptAir Flight 804 vanishes from radar with 66 people aboard

EgyptAir Flight 804 vanishes from radar with 66 people aboard



The plane was flying at 37,000 feet when it lost contact overnight above the Mediterranean Sea, the airline tweeted. French President Francois Hollande said he was told the flight crashed, but Egyptian Civil Aviation Minister Sharif Fathi said he preferred to classify the flight as missing.
"We do not deny there is a possibility of terrorism or deny the possibility of technical fault," Fathi said at a Cairo news conference. "I will continue to use the term missing plane until we find any debris."
For now, finding the airplane and any possible survivors is the priority, authorities said.
Somber relatives gathered in Cairo and Paris airports, seeking word on their loved ones. They were taken to special centers at both airports, where translators and psychiatric support awaited. In Cairo's airport, dozens of relatives paced anxiously in a building set aside for families. Some shouted at photographers taking pictures of them, while others berated officials over the perceived lack of information.
Live updates: Missing flight MS804

Latest developments

-- Greek Defense Minister Panos Kammenos told reporters that search operations have not yet turned up anything.
-- The airplane "swerved and then plunged" before descending into the Mediterranean, the Greek minister told reporters.
-- Greek controllers tried to reach EgyptAir Flight 804 about 10 miles before it left the country's airspace and for about 90 seconds after and received no response, the head of the Hellenic Civil Aviation Authority told Greek broadcaster ANT1 TV.
-- Prosecutors in Paris have opened an investigation into the disappearance of the plane, the office said in a statement. "No hypothesis is privileged or pushed aside for the moment," the statement said.

What happened

The flight seemed to be proceeding normally until it approached Egyptian airspace. Greek controllers talked to the pilot when the plane was near the Greek island of Kea at 37,000 feet at an air speed of 519 mph. Everything seemed fine at that point.
At 3:27 a.m. local time, shortly before the aircraft was scheduled to exit Greek airspace, controllers tried to reach the pilots to transfer control to Cairo authorities. Despite repeated attempts, they received no response, the Hellenic Civil Aviation Authority said. The plane passed into Egyptian airspace two minutes later. Forty seconds later, radar contact was lost, the authority said.
Weather conditions were clear at the time,meteorologist Pedram Javaheri said.